Stephen Hawking Dies at 76,

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Stephen Hawking has died at the age of 76. The renowned theoretical physicist and cosmologist passed away early Wednesday morning at his home in Cambridge, according to a family spokesperson.

“We are deeply saddened that our beloved father passed away today,” his children Lucy, Robert and Tim said in a statement. “He was a great scientist and an extraordinary man whose work and legacy will live on for many years. His courage and persistence with his brilliance and humor inspired people across the world. He once said, ‘It would not be much of a universe if it wasn’t home to the people you love.’ We will miss him forever.”

Dr. Hawking, who was diagnosed with the motor neuron disease ALS at age 21, was best known for his work with black holes and published the international bestseller “A Brief History of Time” in 1988.

He His scientific works include a collaboration with Roger Penrose on gravitational singularity theorems in the framework of general relativity and the theoretical prediction that black holes emit radiation, often called Hawking radiation. Hawking was the first to set out a theory of cosmology explained by a union of the general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics. He was a vigorous supporter of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics.

Hawking was an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA), a lifetime member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States.

In 2002, Hawking was ranked number 25 in the BBC’s poll of the 100 Greatest Britons. He was the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge between 1979 and 2009 and achieved commercial success with works of popular science in which he discusses his own theories and cosmology in general; his book A Brief History of Time appeared on the British Sunday Times best-seller list for a record-breaking 237 weeks.

Hawking had a rare early-onset, a slow-progressing form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) that gradually paralyzed him over the decades.At the time of his death, he was still able to communicate using a single cheek muscle attached to a speech-generating device.




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